Gut Microbes Linked to Weight?

What we often forget as humans is that we could not survive without the trillions of organisms that live around, on and inside us. They help us digest our food, protect us from illnesses, give us illnesses and even play a role in our weight. They don’t play a role in our weight by making us heavier through their mere existence, but rather through better regulating what is absorbed into our bodies. This theory is backed up by new research published in the journal Science and the article can be found here. Researchers transplanted microbes from a variety of humans into mice, and it was observed that those who received bacteria from obese individuals gained more weight than those who received bacteria from slim humans. It was noted that this effect was only observed in those mice who were on a diet of high-fiber and low saturated fat diet and that no improvement was observed in those mice that were on a junk food diet.
It is as of yet unknown how we may change our gut bacteria to better maintain a healthy body, but you might be thinking, ‘What about those fecal transplants I’ve been hearing about?’ Well, fecal transplants are reserved for a more severe issue than a large tummy, namely Clostridium difficle infection. For now we are limited to such things as probiotics which can have a minimal effect as most, but who knows what we will come up with in the future!
You can check out Scientific American’s 60-Second Science segment on this very news over here!
Image via. Huffinton Post

Gut Microbes Linked to Weight?

What we often forget as humans is that we could not survive without the trillions of organisms that live around, on and inside us. They help us digest our food, protect us from illnesses, give us illnesses and even play a role in our weight. They don’t play a role in our weight by making us heavier through their mere existence, but rather through better regulating what is absorbed into our bodies. This theory is backed up by new research published in the journal Science and the article can be found here. Researchers transplanted microbes from a variety of humans into mice, and it was observed that those who received bacteria from obese individuals gained more weight than those who received bacteria from slim humans. It was noted that this effect was only observed in those mice who were on a diet of high-fiber and low saturated fat diet and that no improvement was observed in those mice that were on a junk food diet.

It is as of yet unknown how we may change our gut bacteria to better maintain a healthy body, but you might be thinking, ‘What about those fecal transplants I’ve been hearing about?’ Well, fecal transplants are reserved for a more severe issue than a large tummy, namely Clostridium difficle infection. For now we are limited to such things as probiotics which can have a minimal effect as most, but who knows what we will come up with in the future!

You can check out Scientific American’s 60-Second Science segment on this very news over here!

Image via. Huffinton Post

  1. feathery-dreamer reblogged this from outreachscience and added:
    Oh, I remember hearing about this, shame that I forgot until now. It’s not all “genes” or all “eating”, there’s...
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